Luxgraphicus Design Agency


7 Tips on Why Branding?

Branding and deisgn in canberraFirst of a series of tips for business on branding and design issues.

If you relate to these, and want to know more, call us now to make an appointment.

Comments and opinions also most welcome, don’t be shy.

7 tips on why branding?

  1. Your client’s perception of your business is based on how they see you.
  2. They “see” you at every contact point with your business.
  3. This impression is created in a second.
  4. Their perception is often unconscious.
  5. This perception is often not a considered decision.
  6. To your client, their perception IS reality.
  7. When this perception is positive, potential sales become clients, and clients become advocates.

Why are the best businesses watching their branding?

Again, call us now for an opportunity to discover how your brand is working for your business.

Brian Miller
Creative Director
Luxgraphcius Design Agency

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Tis the season to be branding.

This time each year I normally talk about re-branding, and use a familiar icon of the time to illustrate how brand can influence perception and help your audience to identify with your business.

So lets look at how we might re-brand that icon of the Christmas season which seems to have been taken over by the corporate and commercial world that is modern Christmas, Santa Clause.

Lots of opportunity here to fiddle with looks, colours, and audience perception.

Lets try for a different audience, hipper, young adults. They buy lots of expensive, hi tech stuff at Christmas. They want a cooler, tougher, Santa. One who doesn’t pander to little kids pathetic whims. A rebel the audience can connect and identify with…

Enter, hard rocking, hard drinking, Santa!

 

Hard rocking, hard drinking Santa

What about looking from a different angle? Teenage and early twenties males, older men in mid-life crisis mode, aspiring females (this is a perverse angle, true). What would attract this audience?

Enter, sexy Santa!

Sexy Santa

Or, then there is always the safe option. Family friendly, good for the young kids, traditional, big audience acceptance here…

Yes, it’s fat and friendly Santa Clause!

Friendly and fat Santa

And, for this year especially! How about we take up the most influential brand currently on the planet. Huge audience appeal, trend setter to the biggest market in the world …

Of course it’s, Oprah Clause!

Oprah Winfrey

Oprah Santa

Which Santa would you choose to take the brand into the next century?

Clearly there are pitfalls in several options. But is staying put therefore the best option?

Branding, and even more so, re-branding, are critical business decisions which need to be carefully thought through, planned and implemented.

To stand still could well mean irrelevancy and ultimately, failure. But make sure the change is done well and make use of professionals to guide you through the potential pitfalls.

I think Santa is safe for the time being, although Oprah does seem quite friendly and, if I’m not mistaken, seems to be getting fatter too!

Brian.

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Who needs a designer?

How many psychiatrists does it take to change a light bulb?

Have you had a light bulb moment lately?

Last week I was asked  – “what would a business person be saying that would indicate that they might need a new business identity or re-branding?”

Chances are that those most in need of new or re-branded identities wouldn’t be saying anything about it at all! Those who would interest a designer as a potential client however might be talking about their marketing plan, or plans they have for growing their business, or entering  a new market. They would be giving off clues that they were proactively taking their business on a path towards success.

I answered a research survey from a personal development coach today. By completing the survey and returning it I identified myself as their target audience. I was clearly ready to begin to accept the help of a coach in my development. All people would benefit from these services but it is vital that they, themselves see that they need and are ready for this help. Like the light bulb which can be changed by the single psychiatrist, so long as it wants to change, I was accepting that I too was ready to be helped. The questionaire survey raised several issues which swayed me in the direction of the coaching help, but just by taking the time and effort to start the survey rather than dump it in the bin, was evidence enough that I was ready to take the first steps with the coach. We could all do well by working with a development coach, but we have to want to. In fact it is often those who most need the help that are most unready to accept that help.

Similarly, all business could do well by working with a designer on the audit and review of their existing visual identity. Ongoing management of its application and access to its components for operational and marketing activities will ensure a consistent message delivery. This involvement can also identify areas for improvement and potential need to re-brand or re-fresh the existing branding details.

Those businesses in most need of this service will probably not place any value on it. They will dismiss the effort and resources required as unnecessary or wasteful. They are not ready for the change. They are not the audience of the designer. The designers audience are managing their business towards success. They have plans and they are carrying out those plans. A marketing plan will be key amongst those plans and the delivery of its messages will rely on visual design.

The business person may not know they have need for new design, but they will accept that doing an audit of their visual material is a worthwhile process, and one which could help them on their path towards success. Like the coach’s questionaire, accepting that doing the audit is not a waste of time is the first step in working with a designer to drive the success of the business.

It only takes one good designer to create a fabulous business identity, but the business has to want a fabulous identity!

Brian.

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Canberra Business in Colour

Show off your colours!

We are looking to engage with and capture the spirit and essence of the business community in Canberra with an exciting photographic project – Canberra Business in Colour

Naturally we will need business people to work with us to bring this to realisation.

Our process will involve some time with you the business person, in gathering background information, developing a creative concept for an image, and then in the actual taking of the image. This may take around an hour of your time.

We plan to base the imagery on our own creative concepts, rather than your own business marketing messages, so we can’t promise glossy advertising images for you!

We can promise a friendly and flexible approach however, and nothing you are too uncomfortable doing of course. And we will provide an A4 glossy print and web sized file of your image in return.

If it turns out you’d like to use our final image for marketing of your business we will be happy to discuss a license fee for this purpose.

Long term, we plan to mount an exhibition of the images, and use this as cross promotion of all the businesses involved and Luxgraphicus.

Keen to be involved, or find out more?

Register your interest with our survey here.

or call or email us to discuss things.

Brian.

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Expert design consultant

unity for small business

Good morning all…
Brian Miller, Luxgraphicus, Design Agency

This week an ongoing client contacted us.

They wanted a pull-up banner for use when they give presentations and seminars.

We have already created their business identity, their website design,  business card and brochure.

Their banner will follow the style and rules already established and their brand will be strengthened. People seeing this business will be reassured about its professionalism, stability, and capacity to deliver.

This business has their own expert design consultant ensuring their brand is developed and maintained across all their visual material.

So a good referral for us this week is a business which wants to have their own expert design consultant, working with their business.

“Luxgraphicus”, it’s Latin for… expert design consultant.

Brian

This weeks BNI 60 sec infomercial

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Putting a price on intellectual property of design?

You need more than a handshake.

How would you pay for the intellectual property of your business?

Specifically, the visual material which forms a vital part of the intellectual collateral associated with your business.

I’m not going to tell you the best way, or the cheapest way, or even my opinion here. I’m going to pose the question and provide some alternatives, then let you decide, or at least think about, the answers. Of course, if you’d like to discuss your ideas I’d love you to contribute to the blog here with comments and questions.

As designers, we’re creating intellectual property. But who owns it? Our clients commission us to do it. They pay us. (usually!) It’s created to be used in the operation of the business. But on what basis is it sold to the business? Does the initial fee cover the ownership of the intellectual property? Who owns copyright? Who has license to use the material?

Most of these are legal issues of course, which is not my area of speciality, although I do have some knowledge of copyright law and its application. I’m not going to dive into the deep waters of the legalities here!

But, as the owner of a design business, I am interested in how other business owners would be prepared to pay for the material created.

Recently I’ve been working on several approaches to licensing and payment for branding and identity projects. How would you be prepared to pay for the intellectual property which is so important to your business?

Here are some options;

Pay an upfront fee for the design work, and a license to use the work for the intended purpose. (later negotiation required for use beyond the original scope)

Pay a lesser upfront fee for the design work, with an ongoing (monthly or quarterly) fee for the license to use the work. (with outright transfer of the copyright after a negotiated period)

Pay a lesser upfront fee for the design work, with an ongoing premium on subsequent use of the work in designed and/or printed material. (with outright transfer of the copyright after a negotiated value of work completed)

Pay a greater upfront fee for the design work and full copyright ownership of the work. (no further negotiation required)

All have their strengths and weaknesses. There are, no doubt, alternatives too. As well as analogies from other industries.

As the owner of a design business I have my own preferred options, and as an innovator and entrepreneur, I can offer business owners added value through additional services within the licensing options, but which would the market support? (I’ll fill you in on the added value bits in subsequent posts!)

So which would you, as a small business owner or operator, be prepared to accept, to secure the intellectual property of your business?

Over to you…

Brian.

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Check out the packaging!

Good morning all
Brian Miller, for Luxgraphicus Design Agency.

This week I’m in serious training for the Fun Run on Sunday.

So… when I got the beer home I was excited to unpack it.

And even more excited to find out how many colours of ink they use to print the packaging!

count the colours!

Not happy with the usual 4 colours, these guys love their packaging so much they use eight different colours of ink. That’s the most I’ve seen lately, even cereal boxes only manage to get to 7 colours.

They want their package to look so good that really serious runners just have to take some home.

Do you want to talk about how to package up your important product, your business?

Then just talk to us at Luxgraphicus,

it’s Latin for “check out the packaging!

Brian (this weeks BNI 60 second infomercial)

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